A Global March

Flavie de Germay, Staff Writer

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On Friday, January 20 in Washington D.C., Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States. The next day, a demonstration that aims to bring over a million women and men to the nation’s capital will formally protest his inauguration as Commander-in-Chief. An estimated 200,000 people from all over the country will travel to Washington to join the march. The group organizing the demonstration, “Women’s March on Washington,” said they plan for protesters to “March from Lincoln Memorial to the White House to show [their] strength, power, and courage and demonstrate [their] disapproval of the new President and his values in a peaceful march.”

While the marches have been inspired by the Women’s March on Washington, other states will have individual marches organized by volunteers at the local level.

The march in Maui, Hawaii, for example, will begin with a moment of silence and a traditional Hawaiian blessing, a press release explains. The march in Birmingham, Alabama, will begin at the 16th Baptist Church, an icon of the civil rights era that was recently declared a national monument.

According to The Huffington Post, The biggest marches outside of Washington are planned in New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle, Portland, Boston, Denver, San Francisco, Austin and Minneapolis/St. Paul.

On an international scale, hundreds of demonstrations around the world are being planned for Jan. 21 in conjunction with the Women’s March on Washington, which is expected to be the largest inauguration-related demonstration in United States history. Internationally, 55 marches have been planned in cities such as Paris, Sydney and Nairobi.

Participants outside the United States say they are marching in solidarity with American women and standing up for women’s rights in their own countries and worldwide.

“This is a global movement,” national sister march spokeswoman, Yordanos Eyoel, told The Huffington Post. The aim, Eyoel continued explaining, is “not to detract from the March in Washington, but to encourage people everywhere to spread the word about the values and principles the group advocates for.” They also give an important nod to movements that came before them: the suffragists and abolitionists, the American Indian Movement, the Civil Rights era, Black Lives Matter, Occupy Wall Street and the fight for LGBTQ rights.

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